IELTS Energy 361: How to Use the New York Times for an IELTS 8 or Higher

Today we talk about how you can use The New York Times to get an IELTS 8 or higher!new york times ielts 8 higher

This newspaper is the pinnacle of excellent writing. Thus, there is a great deal you can learn from their articles to improve all your IELTS skills.

For grammar, for instance, you can choose 3 impressive sentence structures and copy the whole sentence in your notebook. Then, you can try to emulate these structures yourself.

You can also read articles from a variety of sections to elevate your culture of thinking.

This newspaper is most useful, however, to learn vocabulary. There will be a lot of words in these articles that you do not know, as this extremely high-level writing.

Therefore, there really are no wrong words to choose. Basically, any words or phrases that you find interesting, and are new, you can add to your vocabulary notebook. Remember, however, you must review and practice using these words in order for them to be available to you on exam day!

We used this article about Obama’s farewell address to bring you new, useful, high-scoring and interesting vocabulary today.

You can use this vocabulary for Speaking Part 3 and Writing Task 2. However, the adjectives you can use to describe feelings on any part of the exam.

 

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Sentence 1:

President Obama, delivering a farewell address, in the city that launched his political career, declared on Tuesday his continued confidence in the American experiment, but he warned in the wake of a toxic presidential election that economic inequity, racism and closed-mindedness threatened to shred the nation’s democratic fabric.

IELTS-useful vocabulary:

  • toxic: (adj.) poisonous; something full of negativity and damage
  • rancor: [Jessica uses this to talk about the election] (n.) hate
  • in the wake of: (linking phrase) after

Sentence 2:

Speaking to a rapturous crowd that recalled the excitement of his path-breaking campaign in 2008, Mr. Obama said he believed that even the deepest ideological divides could be bridged.

IELTS-useful vocabulary:

  • rapturous: (adj.) completely wrapped up and in love with something

Sentence 3:

His words were nevertheless etched with frustration, a blunt coda to a remarkable day that laid bare many of the racial crosscurrents in the country.

IELTS-useful vocabulary:

  • etch with: (v.) to carve permanently; imbued

Now it’s your turn to practice! Add these words to your vocabulary notebook and use them in your own practice IELTS answers.

What do you think of today’s vocabulary?

Share your example sentences in the comments section below.

 

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  • 1) Americans continue their confidence in the American experiment in presidential elections .
    2) In the wake of a toxic war that is full of rancor , miseries follow .
    3) Speaking to a rapturous / fanatical crowd , the celebrity has tears in his eyes .
    4) His words were genuinely etched with wisdom and passion .
    5) It is a remarkable day to honor the brave men and women who lost their lives in the ongoing pursuit of human dignity and freedom .
    6) Many of the racial crosscurrents in the US are an incovenient setback for building bridges .

    • Bindhu Peter

      Hi, can you tell me the meaning of racial crosscurrents and your number 6 sentence complete meaning.
      Thanks
      Bindhu