IELTS Energy 78: How to Write a Beautiful Body Paragraph for IELTS Writing Task 2

IELTS Writing Task 2 body paragraphIELTS Writing is a huge challenge for many students!

Are you worried about IELTS Writing Task 2? Do you know how to organize your paragraphs?

Today you’ll find out how to write an awesome body paragraph for Writing Task 2.

We’ll give you the formula, linking words, examples, and the steps that you need to follow to get a 7 or higher on this part of the IELTS Writing test.

Last week we talked about how write an introduction on Writing Task 2 and today we’ll talk about the body paragraph.

The best information in your essay should go into the body paragraph.

The introduction and conclusion should not contain any substantial information.

You’ll need two body paragraphs which describe two sides of the issue for an argument essay.

  • Sentence 1 (topic sentence): Basic summary of what you are going to talk about. Present the main idea of the paragraph. For example, “There are many reasons to support co-ed schools.” By using a broad sentence you leave it open to go into more detail

 

  • Sentence 2 (first reason): Give the reason for what you are saying in your topic sentence. Use a lot of linking words. For example, “Firstly, there is a lot to learn by going to school with the opposite gender.” Next you need to add more details to expand on that idea. You can use personal examples or fake research here. You do not need to use statistics that are actually real. You can make them up. Try to have 5-6 sentences.

 

  • At the end of the body paragraph you don’t have to summarize what you have said because you might run out of time to write the conclusion paragraph.

 

Stick to this structure, stay organized, and practice it many times before the exam.

Use a variety of topics when you practice.

This structure will become a habit for you and you will be able to increase your score on the IELTS Writing test.

 

What questions do you have about IELTS body paragraphs?

Let us know in the comments below.

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  • Body Paragraph # 1 :
    Topic sentence – There are many good reasons to support internet education in schools and at home . Reasons & Examples – First of all , there is so much available information online by clicking … Secondly , ……. Thirdly , …..

    Body Paragraph # 2 :
    Topic sentence – There are some negative reasons of using internet for educational purposes . Reasons & Examples – Firstly , the cost of accessing internet is not really affordable to ordinary people . Secondly , …. Thirdly , …..

  • Molly Yang

    ONE Body-graph:
    Sentence 1 (topic sentence): Basic summary of what you are going to talk about. Present the main idea of the paragraph. For example, “There are many reasons to support co-ed schools.” By using a broad sentence you leave it open to go into more detail

    Sentence 2 (first reason): Give the reason for what you are saying in your topic sentence. Use a lot of linking words. For example, “Firstly, there is a lot to learn by going to school with the opposite gender.”

    Sentence 3 (Example details)Next you need to add more details to expand on that idea. You can use personal examples or fake research here. You do not need to use statistics that are actually real. You can make them up. Try to have 5-6 sentences. i.e. “For example, ….”

    (Sentence 4… In addition, + another reason starts + example details)

    At the end of the body paragraph you don’t have to summarize what you have said because you might run out of time to write the conclusion paragraph.

  • Joshua Jethroh

    There is no score for the topic sentences in IELTS writing. Where in the rubric does it say? Pauline from Cambridge (the writer and author of many IELTS Cambridge) warns students not to memorise or write a template/structure including topic sentence.This makes their writing piece so ‘mechanical’. At the end of day, there is no score for topic or concluding sentence. Otherwise the burden of proof is on who claims this.
    Cheerio:)

    • Leweiss

      I think it’s part of coherence and cohesion. Topic sentences provide broad ideas while the following sentences provided more specific details. In terms of mechanical, overusing cohesive devices may result to faulty or mechanical sentences however it does not mean that using cohesive devices are a mark down. Appropriate use of cohesive devices is a requirement for getting higher band scores.
      -Trina

      • Jethro Joshua

        “I think” = your opinion!! The rubric has no pointers to support your assumption dear. You are trying to make such a wide stretch by including non-essential lessons. Ielts has nothing to do with Uni lessons or models — you may refer the model essays written by the Ielts writers ( Camb 1-11). You will see essays that have no topic sentences. I am sure this info is not authentic , and presumably you are not a qualified Cambridge assessor.

        • Leweiss

          Yes, clearly it’s my opinion and just like you I’m not a qualified Cambridge assessor. It’s fair to say that we are of equal footing my dear. Just teasing 🙂

          Going back to the topic, I’ve been teaching college writing and academic writing for several years now and I can say that it is quite a challenge for non-writers to create coherent and cohesive essays and write-ups without following a certain form of rhetoric. In the case of most IELTS test takers who are either second language users or foreign language users, they tend to apply their mother tongue’s rhetoric in writing which is, unfortunately, very different from western rhetoric. If such candidates, assuming that they are not used to writing, are not familiar with western rhetoric then it will be extra challenging for them to get a band score above 6.

          I do agree with you that a number of samples from Cambridge do not exhibit the use of topic sentences. However, this just implies that western rhetoric is not boxed in one or two structures. There are a variety of ways in which western essay writing can be done; one way is by the use of topic sentences. Dismissing the practical use of topic sentences and its effectiveness if used well in writing just because you did not read them in the IELTS rubrics (public) is highly arguable.

        • Leweiss

          Yes, clearly it’s my opinion and just like you I’m not a qualified Cambridge assessor. It’s fair to say that we are of equal footing my dear. Just teasing 🙂

          Going back to the topic, I’ve been teaching college writing and academic writing for several years now and I can say that it is quite a challenge for non-writers to create coherent and cohesive essays and write-ups without following a certain form of rhetoric. In the case of most IELTS test takers who are either second language users or foreign language users, they tend to apply their mother tongue’s rhetoric in writing which is, unfortunately, very different from western rhetoric. If such candidates, assuming that they are not used to writing, are not familiar with western rhetoric then it will be extra challenging for them to get a band score above 6.

          I do agree with you that a number of samples from Cambridge do not exhibit the use of topic sentences. However, this just implies that western rhetoric is not boxed in one or two structures. There are a variety of ways in which western essay writing can be done; one way is by the use of topic sentences. Dismissing the practical use of topic sentences and their effectiveness if used well in writing just because you did not read them in the IELTS rubrics (public) is highly arguable.

        • Leweiss

          I do understand Pauline’s point since I’ve seen students who tend to produce mechanical paragraphs when initially taught the concept of topic sentences. To overcome this problem, the next step is to train candidates about text flow or sentence flow. Based on feedback and numerous satisfying IELTS results from my students, the strategy works. Their knowledge of topic sentences helped them organize their ideas and prevented off topics. Along the learning sessions, they were able to be more flexible in the use of topic sentences particularly, their positions.

          • Jessica Beck

            Hello everyone! As a qualified IELTS professional, I can tell you exactly how the topic sentence relates to the scoring system. In order to get a 6 for Cohesion/Coherence, you must have paragraphs in which most of the ideas are focused on one central point, which is stated, usually, in the topic sentence. You must show some ability to use transition phrases to connect these ideas in a logical way, or a way that ‘flows’. In order to get a 7 or higher, all of the ideas in the paragraph must be focused on a clear, central point, and they must flow, or connect, in a way that the reader has no problem following. Teaching students topic sentences and linking words is how we give them the tools to fulfill these requirements for Cohesion/Coherence. So, although the rubric does not explicitly state ‘topic sentence’, the function of the topic sentence, as setting forth the main idea on which to further expound, must be present in order to compose an organized, logical, high-scoring essay. You must also consider the level/background of the student you are teaching, as organizational elements may not be the same in their culture’s writing, and they may also have no background in writing academic essays in English. Therefore it is essential to start with the ‘bones’ of the essay, and, once those are understood, you can guide them in creating more advanced compositions. I realize some of these ideas have already by discussed in this thread, but I wanted to add my thoughts!

          • Leweiss

            Oh! Thank you for posting! 🙂 It’s good to know directly from an IELTS pro. 🙂